A Dictionary of American Proverbs

By Wolfgang Mieder; Stewart A. Kingsbury et al. | Go to book overview

e

each (pn.) To each his own. Rec. dist.: U.S. Infm.: Similar to "Every man to his own taste." 1st cit.: US 1713 Wise, Churches Quarrel Espoused, ed. Cook, Scholar's Facsimile Reprints ( 1966). 20c. coll.: Whiting125, Whiting (MP)192.

each (adj.) SEE Take each DAY as it comes. / Into each life some RAIN must fall.

eagle1. Attempt not to fly like an eagle with the wings of a wren. Rec. dist.: Mich. 1st cit.: 1909 Hudson, A foot in England. 20c. coll.: Stevenson 26:50:1.

2. Eagles don't catch flies. Rec. dist.: Colo., N.Y. 1st cit.: 1574 Guazzo, Civile Conversation, tr. Petrie, T. T. ( 1925); US 1645 Wheelwright , His Writings, ed. Bell, Publ. Prince Soc. ( 1876). 20c. coll.: Stevenson 650:5, Whiting125, Whiting (MP)192.

3. Eagles fly alone, but sheep flock together. Var.: Eagles sleep alone, but sheep flock together. Rec. dist.: Ill., Mich., Wis.1st cit.: ca 1580 Sidney, Arcadia. 20c. coll.: ODEP211, Stevenson 651:8.

4. Eagles fly high. Rec. dist.: Vt.

5. The old age of an eagle is as good as the youth of a sparrow. Rec. dist.: Ill., Wis.

6. When the eagle is dead, the crows pick out his eyes. Rec. dist.: Ill.

7. Where the carrion is, there the eagles gather. Var.: Where the carcass is, there will the eagles be gathered. Rec. dist.: Ill., Ind., N.Y. 1st cit.: ca 1566 Curio, Pasquin in Trance; US 1654 Johnson, Wonder-Working. 20c. coll.: ODEP 102, Whiting57, CODP31, Stevenson 651:3, T&W56, Whiting (MP)91.

SEE ALSO Puttin' FEATHERS on a buzzard don't make it no eagle. / A good SURGEON must have an eagle's eye, a lion's heart, and a lady's hand.

ear (body) 1. A pair of good ears will drain dry a hundred tongues. Rec. dist.: Ill., Minn., N.J., N.Dak.1st cit.: 1640 Herbert, Outlandish Proverbs (Jacula Prudentum) in Works, ed. Hutchinson ( 1941); US 1753 Franklin, PRAlmanac. 20c. coll.: ODEP607, Stevenson 655:7.

2. An open ear and a closed mouth is the best known substitution for wisdom. Rec. dist.: Utah.

3. Give every man your ear but few your voice. Rec. dist.: Ill., N.Y., Utah. 1st cit.: 1600 Shakespeare, Hamlet. 20c. coll.: Stevenson 656:1.

4. Have a wide ear and a short tongue. Rec. dist.: Minn. 1st cit.: 1597 Politeuphuia Wits Commonwealth. 20c. coll.: ODEP887, Stevenson 652:1.

5. He who has ears to hear, let him hear. Rec. dist.: N.Y., Utah. 1st cit.: US 1948 Stevenson, Home Book of Proverbs. 20c. coll.: Stevenson 653:8.

6. Keep your ears open: even a rattlesnake will warn before he bites. Rec. dist.: Ark., Ga., Ohio.

7. No ear is deaf to the song that gold sings. Rec. dist.: N.Y.

8. No ear is so deaf as one which wishes not to hear. Rec. dist.: N.Y.

9. One can't hear one's own ears. Rec. dist.: Tex. 1st cit.: 1738 Swift, Collection of Genteel and Ingenious Conversation. 20c. coll.: Stevenson 654:4.

10. What the ear does not hear disturbs not the mind. Rec. dist.: Minn.1st cit.: US 1875 Scarborough, Chinese Proverbs. 20c. coll.: Stevenson 738:2.

11. You'll hear a lot of things before your ears drop off. Rec. dist.: Ohio.

SEE ALSO It is better to trust the EYE than the ear. / A FOOL talks with his ears stuffed up. / HUNGRY bellies have no ears. / Little PITCHERS have big ears. / You can't make a silk PURSE out of a sow's ear. / You can't tell how far a RABBIT can jump by the length of its ears. / Tune your own UTTERANCE to your own ear. / The WALL has ears, and the plain has eyes.

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A Dictionary of American Proverbs
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Abbreviations xvii
  • A 3
  • B 33
  • C 79
  • D 133
  • E 173
  • F 193
  • G 245
  • I 323
  • J 337
  • K 345
  • L 357
  • M 395
  • N 423
  • O 435
  • P 447
  • Q 493
  • R 497
  • S 521
  • T 579
  • U 623
  • V 629
  • W 637
  • Y 685
  • Z 689
  • Bibliography 691
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