Major Speeches and Debates of Senator Joe McCarthy Delivered in the United States Senate, 1950-1951

By Joseph McCarthy | Go to book overview

JUNE 2, 1960
Lattimore letter on Chinese Employed by OWI; Additional Information on Philip Jessup

Mr. McCARTRY. Mr. President, first I should like to compliment the Senator from Michigan for his outstanding presentation of the legal aspects of the Amerasia case.

Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent to insert in the CONGRESSIONAL RECORD at this point a number of documents. The first is a letter dated June 15, 1943, marked "Secret," written by Mr. Owen Lattimore to Mr. Joseph Barnes, of the Office of War Information. This letter has been discussed in some detail in the past. In discussing it before the National Convention of Editors, I pointed out that this letter constituted an order by Mr. Lattimore to Mr. Barnes to discharge all anti-Communist Chinese and to replace them with Chinese friendly to the Communist Party. The State Department subsequently put out a White Paper in which they said this was untrue, and in effect said that actually this document constituted a direction to be very careful not to hire Communists. Since that time I made the decision to make public some of the allegedly secret files, which explain the purport of this letter very well. These files are rather unusual. We find the case of two Chinese Communists who had been declared ineligible for Government employment. It is a case which Mr. Lattimore had succeeded in having reopened before the Loyalty Board. I am not able to find the exact quotation from the finding of the Loyalty Board. However, I am asking that these documents be printed in the RECORD, and anyone who wishes to see the exact words of the Loyalty Board will find them in these papers. The Loyalty Board in effect said. "This puts us in the very unusual position of either approving for Government employment a known Communist or turning down the recommendation of the head of the Department." In this case it was Mr. Lattimore. They decided not to turn Mr. Lattimore down and they hired the two Communists whom Mr. Lattimore mentioned in this letter. I think it is rather important that all Members of the Senate have access to these documents, and I ask that they be inserted in the RECORD at this point.

There being no objection, the letter and documents were ordered to be printed in the RECORD, as follows:

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., June 15, 1943.
Mr. JOSEPH BARNES.

Office of War Information,

New York, N. Y.

DEAR JOE: In your capacity as a member of our personnel security committee there are certain things which you ought to know about Chinese personnel. It is a delicate matter for me to tell you about these things because of my recent official connection with Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek. For that reason I am marking this communication secret.

When we recently reduced the number of our Chinese staff in New York it was quite obvious that there was going to be trouble and that this trouble would take the form of accusations against the remaining personnel. The fact is that certain of the personnel with whose services we dispensed had connections outside the office. This leads directly into the main question. It is extremely important from the point of view of security that intelligence Information should not leak out of our office through our Chinese personnel. It is an open secret in Washington that the security of various Chinese agencies there is deplorable. Any pipeline from our office to any of those agencies is not a pipeline but practically an open conduit.

However. it is not only a question of Chinese Government agencies. There is also a well-organized and well-financed organization among the Chinese in this country connected with Wang Ching-wei, the Japanese puppet. This can be traced back to the history of the Chinese revolution as a whole. To present it in the fewest possible words: Sun Yat-sen was largely financed for many years by Chinese living abroad. Not only Sun Yat-sen but Wang Ching-wei had close connections among the overseas Chinese. However much he is a traitor now, the fact must be recognized that Wang Ching-wei to a veteran of Chinese communities abroad, including those In the United States.

Chinese In the United States come almost exclusively from a few localities on the coast of China, practically every one of which is now occupied by the Japanese. Thus theme Chinese in America have both family connections and financial investments which are under the control of the Japanese, and because of his years of political organizing work

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