Major Speeches and Debates of Senator Joe McCarthy Delivered in the United States Senate, 1950-1951

By Joseph McCarthy | Go to book overview

DECEMBER 15, 1950
Statement on Drew Pearson

Mr. MCCARTHY. Mr. President, the other night I told one of my fellow Senators that today I intended to discuss the background of one of the cleverest men who has ever prostituted one of the noblest professions--a man who, in my opinion, has been and is doing an infinite amount of damage to America and all of the Institutions of our form of Government. When I told the Senator this, he said: " MCCARTHY, don't do it." He said it would be like having stood In the mouth of the Cloaca Maxima and having tried to stop the flow. He said: "You will be merely inundated by the slime and smear and he will still go on every day and every week polluting otherwise fine newspapers and poisoning the air waves."

I realize that the task of exposing this man, or perhaps I should say this person, will be an unpleasant, disagreeable task, which will leave me more than a bit bloodied up also, but as I told the Senator the other night--when I was a boy on the farm my mother used to raise chickens. From those chickens the groceries for a large family were supplied, as well as mother's Christmas money. The greatest enemy the chickens had were skunks. In order to protect mother's chickens my three brothers and I had to dig out and destroy those skunks. It was a dirty, foul, unpleasant, smelly Job. We learned early in life that the Jobs that most badly need doing and are so often left undone are often the most difficult and unpleasant jobs.

I do not agree with the Senator who advised me the other night--I do not agree that this is an impossible task. I think that while it cannot be done overnight, this man can be exposed to the American people for what he is, at which time he will no longer be dangerous.

Before discussing the important place which he holds in the Communist scheme of propaganda, I would like to describe him in the words of some expert witnesses, well known and highly respected by the Senate.

First, let me quote one of the outstanding Senators from the other side of the aisle--one of the great Senators, not only of today but great in the entire history of this Senate, the Senator from Georgia [Mr. GEORGE]. On the floor of the United States Senate, on the 21st of February 1944, he said:

[ Pearson) began his whole tirade with a deliberate lie. * * * It is not often that an ordinary, congenital, deliberate, and malicious liar such as Drew Pearson refers to a printed record on which it is possible to pin him down. * * * What sort of a liar is he, Mr. President, when in the very face of the RECORD which he himself invites every word that he said is disproved? * * *

Mr. President, I know some of the motive, some of the malice, back of this sudden attack by Drew Pearson on me. * * * Down deep is a fight against representative government. It is a smear campaign against the legislative branch of this Government. * * *

Again I ask what sort of a liar is Mr. "Skunk" Pearson? ( CONGRESSIONAL RECORD, vol. 90, pt. 2, pp. 1903-1904.)

Next, let me quote Morris A. Bealle, a highly respected writer:

All the boys in the Washington press galleries, except the leftist stooges and Communist sympathizers and "New" Deal dog robbers, have an abiding contempt for this fellow who had brought prostitution of their great profession to its zenith. They say: "When bigger lies are told Pearson will tell them."

He goes on further to say:

"The truth is not in him; he is a pathological liar." ( Washington Squirrel Cage, 1948 ed., p. 39.)

Pearson makes his living by blackening characters. He is a smear columnist, a professional character assassin, and the author of false and vile insinuations. ( Washington Squirrel Cage, 1948 ed., p. 39.)

On the 17th of December 1941. Representative MARION T. BENNETT, of Missouri, described Pearson as follows:

Pearson and Allen * * * do not have the manhood or honor to admit their mistake. * * * These two columnists have prevaricated. * * * They are well- known in informed circles because of their utter lack of regard for the truth and for being two of the most dishonest, unreliable, and vicious character assassins in America. They are a disgrace to the great newspaper profession. They apparently seldom take the trouble to ascertain the facts. * * *

-161-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Major Speeches and Debates of Senator Joe McCarthy Delivered in the United States Senate, 1950-1951
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 358

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.