Major Speeches and Debates of Senator Joe McCarthy Delivered in the United States Senate, 1950-1951

By Joseph McCarthy | Go to book overview

JUNE 14, 1951
America's Retreat From Victory; the Story of Gen. George C. Marshall

Mr. McCARTHY obtained the floor.

Mr. WHERRY. Mr. President, will the Senator yield so that I may suggest the absence of a quorum?

Mr. McCARTHY. I will if the Senator insists, but would rather not yield for that purpose, because I have informed many Senators that in view of the fact that this speech is approximately 60,000 words, I do not expect them to sit and listen to it as I deliver it, but I hope they will read it when I have concluded.

While I normally will yield for questions at any time, I hope Senators will refrain from interrupting until I have developed a part of the evidence in this matter.

Mr. President, in closely following the CONGRESSIONAL RECORD testimony before the Joint Committee on Foreign Relations and Armed Services, sitting jointly, which is conducting an investigation of the dismissal of Douglas MacArthur, I have become more and more impressed by two inescapable facts:

First. That it is impossible to develop the facts in the MacArthur inquiry without at the same time bringing to light some of the facts which bear on the question of why we fell from our position as the most powerful Nation on earth at the end of World War II to a position of declared weakness by our leadership.

Second. That it will be equally Impossible to obtain the answers to the above without uncovering a conspiracy so immense and an infamy so black as to dwarf any previous such venture in the history of man. During the Marshall testimony, one of the Senators obviously troubled by the odor of the conspiracy which was commencing to rise as a result of the constant probing by the members of the committee--troubled by the fringes of the conspiracy which were commencing to show--came to my office and asked me for information on a subject which was troubling and puzzling him greatly. While I cannot quote him verbatim, the questions he asked were substantially as follows:

First. Who was close to Marshall and succeeded in deceiving this great American at Yalta when his military advice was that we turn Manchuria over to Russia, thereby signing at least the first section in the death warrant of the Republic of China?

Second. Who twisted and perverted the thinking of this great American and misguided him into the folly of his disastrous mission to China?

Third. Who, of tortured disloyalty to America, succeeded In deceiving this great general during the course of World War II to the end that he always sided with Stalin and against Churchill when history's great decisions were being made--decisions which turned out so bad for the free world and so good for international communism?

Upon searching for the answers for the Senator, I found to my surprise that Marshall, who, by the alchemy of propaganda, became the "greatest living American," and the recently proclaimed "master of global strategy" for the party in power, has never had his record subjected to the searching light of any historian. In view of the fact that the committee, the Congress, and the American people are being called upon either to endorse or reject Marshall's global strategy, I felt that it was urgent that such a study be made and submitted to the Russell committee.


MARSHALL'S RECORD FROM FRIENDLY SOURCES

I decided that the record of Marshall's unbroken series of decisions and acts, contributing so greatly to the strategy of defeat, should be given not from the pens and lips of his critics but from sources friendly to him. In view of the fact that the archives of this Nation and other nations are not available to me, I have been unable to document all of the important details of his record. However, sufficient evidence is available to give a picture which is complete in its general outline. I have drawn on the written record; on the memoirs of the principal actors in the great events of the last 10 years; I have drawn heavily from the books out of which the history of these times will be written for the next 500 years; I have drawn from the pens of Admiral Leahy, Winston

-215-

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