Selling War: The British Propaganda Campaign against American "Neutrality" in World War II

By Nicholas John Cull | Go to book overview

2
To War with Words: British Propaganda in the United States during the Phoney War, September 1939 to May 1940

Both winning the war and the prospects for a stable free world afterwards depend ultimately on whether we win and keep the sympathy of the 130,000,000 Americans.

Lord Lothian, September 19391

At 11:15 on the morning of Sunday, September 3, 1939, Neville Chamberlain broadcast to the people of Britain. In somber tones he delivered the long-dreaded message: Britain was at war with Germany. Moments later, air raid sirens wailed across the city. A German preemptive strike seemed at hand. Inside the Ministry of Information, members of the staff were clustered around office radio sets. At the sound of the siren, they moved en masse into the specially prepared basement shelter. At Broadcasting House, the American correspondents waited, ready for the story that many believed would transform the foreign policy of their country. But the deluge didn't come that day. The siren was a false alarm, and the war at first proved little more substantial. Allied forces assumed their defensive positions in France and waited. In the meantime, Hitler devastated Poland.

London's reprieve gave little respite to the MoI's American specialists. Life could never be easy for a propaganda office pledged to conduct no propaganda. In basing its strategy for wooing American public opinion on a steady flow of news, the Ministry planners had assumed that the war would be worth reporting, but in place of high drama in France the MoI had only the "Bore War." Their American work, moreover, suffered from the lack of a clear objective. The American Division officially worked toward "the creation of general goodwill," while the BBC American Liaison Unit was supposed to be "familiarising American listeners with the situation in this country and thus enlisting their

-33-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Selling War: The British Propaganda Campaign against American "Neutrality" in World War II
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 280

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.