American Literature in Nineteenth-Century England

By Clarence Gohdes | Go to book overview

I. THE BOOKTRADE

"In the four quarters of the globe, who reads an American Book?"

-- SYDNEY SMITH in the Edinburgh Review for January, 1820.

LONG BEFORE the Revolutionary War the American book was a well- known, albeit minor, feature of the English and Scottish booktrade, and a few authors--like Jonathan Edwards--had laid the groundwork for a European reputation which is now theirs. A Colonial writer who had produced a manuscript which seemed to be of more than local interest often arranged for first publication in Europe, then as now a sure means of securing respect at home. Increase Mather may be taken as an example. Of the nonfragmentary separates which he published during the years 1663 to 1726, one hundred and two in number, thirteen were first brought out in London, one in Amsterdam, and one in Edinburgh.1 But more numerous by far than such first editions were the British reprints of works previously published in America. The very first book of which the historian of printing in the United States may boast, The Bay Psalm Book of 1640, went through at least eighteen editions in England and twenty- two in Scotland before 1759.2 Then, too, many books manufactured in the Colonies were exported and offered for sale in certain British bookstores, especially those owned by the men engaged in the fairly lucrative business of dispatching reading matter to the tradesmen of Boston, New York, and Philadelphia.

The struggles of the Revolution and the War of 1812 served to quicken European interest in the new States, and British trade in American books was probably enhanced,3 although, for a time, first

____________________
1
Thomas J. Holmes, Increase Mather: a Bibliography of His Works, Cleveland, 1931, I, xxviii-xxxii.
2
Henry W. Boynton, Annals of American Bookselling 1838-1850, New York, 1932, p. 28; The Bay Psalm Book, New York [ 1903], Introduction, pp. viii-ix.
3
For interest in the United States and in its early writings see the following: William B. Cairns, British Criticisms of American Writings 1783-1815, Madison, Wis., 1918; W. B. Cairns, British Criticisms of American Writings 1815-1833, Madison, Wis., 1922; R. B. Heilman, America in English Fiction 1760-1800: the Influence ofthe American Revolution

-14-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
American Literature in Nineteenth-Century England
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • Introduction: the British Attitude 1
  • I. the Booktrade 14
  • Ii. the Periodicals 47
  • Iii. Humor 71
  • Iv. Longfellow 99
  • V. of Critics and Influence 127
  • Appendix 151
  • Index 181
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 196

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.