A Layperson's Guide to Criminal Law

By Raneta Lawson Mack | Go to book overview

Glossary
Accessory after the Fact: A person who aids in concealing a completed crime or hinders law enforcement investigation of completed criminal activity.
Acquittal: A determination by the judge or jury that the prosecution has not met its burden of proving the defendant's guilt beyond a reasonable doubt. After an acquittal, the defendant is free to leave and cannot be criminally prosecuted for that offense again.
Affirmative Defense: A defense offered as a justification or excuse for the defendant's conduct. Self-defense and insanity are examples of criminal law affirmative defenses.
Aiding and Abetting: Encouraging or facilitating the commission of a crime by another with the intent that the crime be committed. A person who aids and abets another will be charged with the same offense as the person who committed the offense.
Arraignment: The formal proceeding after arrest during which the defendant is formally charged with the crime and asked to enter a plea to the charges.
Arson: Using an incendiary device or explosive with the intent to cause damage to property or vehicles.
Assault and Battery: An unlawful attempt to injure a victim coupled with the present ability to commit a violent injury (battery). An assault may range from a simple assault (without a battery) to a first-degree assault in which the victim suffers serious physical injury.
Attempt: The intent to commit a specific offense plus a substantial step toward the commission of that offense.

-191-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Layperson's Guide to Criminal Law
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 206

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.