His Last Bow: Some Reminiscences of Sherlock Holmes

By Arthur Conan Doyle; Owen Dudley Edwards | Go to book overview

The Disappearance of Lady Frances Carfax

'BUT why Turidsh?' asked Mr Sherlock Holmes, gazing fixedly at my boots. I was reclining in a cane-backed chair at the moment, and my protruded feet had attracted his ever-active attention.

'English,' I answered, in some surprise. 'I got them at Latimer's, in Oxford Street.'*

Holmes smiled with an expression of weary patience.

'The bath!' he said; 'the bath! Why the relaxing and expensive Turkish rather than the invigorating home-made article?'

'Because for the last few days I have been feeling rheumatic and old. A Turkish bath is what we call an alterative in medicine--a fresh starting-point, a cleanser of the system.

'By the way, Holmes,' I added, 'I have no doubt the connection between my boots and a Turkish bath is a perfectly self-evident one to a logical mind, and yet I should be obliged to you if you would indicate it.'

'The train of reasoning is not very obscure, Watson,' said Hohnes, with a mischievous twinkle. 'It belongs to the same elementary class of deduction which I should illustrate if I were to ask you who shared your cab in your drive this morning.'

'I don't admit that a fresh illustration is an explanation,' said I, with some asperity.

' Bravo, Watson! A very dignified and logical remonstrance. Let me see, what were the points? Take the last one first--the cab. You observe that you have some splashes on the left sleeve and shoulder of your coat. Had you sat in the centre of a hansom you would probably have had no splashes, and if you had they would certainly have been symmetrical. Therefore it is clear that you sat at the side. Therefore it is equally clear that you had a companion.'*

'That is very evident.'

-116-

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His Last Bow: Some Reminiscences of Sherlock Holmes
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • General Editor's Preface to the Series vii
  • Introduction xi
  • Note on the Text xxxvi
  • Select Bibliography xxxvii
  • A Chronology of Arthur Conan Doyle xliii
  • Preface 3
  • Wisteria Lodge 5
  • The Bruce-Partington Plans 37
  • The Devil's Foot 68
  • The Red Circle 95
  • The Disappearance of Lady Frances Carfax 116
  • The Dying Detective 138
  • His Last Bow 155
  • Explanatory Notes 173
  • Appendix Three Unsigned Pieces by P. G. Wodehouse 244
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