Ordered Liberty: A Constitutional History of New York

By Peter J. Galie | Go to book overview

tory. I have provided a fairly comprehensive bibliographic essay for those who wish to explore individual topics or conventions in more depth.

This volume is intended to provide a readable chronicle of New York State's constitutional history for those who wish to understand our state's constitutional tradition, including college instructors who teach New York history or government, elementary and secondary school teachers who are required by the Board of Regents to teach New York history and government, and lawyers and judges who may wish to put the current Constitution in the historical context out of which it emerged.

The author would like to single out four individuals from among the many who have assisted in the writing of this history: Francine Gray, secretary to the Political Science Department at Canisius College, who gave unstintingly of her time and advice and whose copyediting improved every aspect of the book; Christopher Bopst, my student research assistant, whose research skill, determination, and suggestions were indispensable to its successful completion; the anonymous reviewer whose comments proved invaluable; Gerald Benjamin, who gave me encouragement, intellectual support, and friendship; and Amy Romessor, my student research assistant, who helped compile the index.


NOTES
1.
( Buffalo: William S. Hein & Co., 1994 [orig. publ. 1906]).
2.
( New York: Neale Publishing Co., 1915).

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