Noble, Wretched, & Redeemable: Protestant Missionaries to the Indians in Canada and the United States, 1820-1900

By C. L. Higham | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

THIS WORK could not have been completed without the help and direction of a vast number of people. First, I must thank Howard Lamar for introducing me to Western American history, and Alec Douglas and John Herd Thompson for introducing me to Canadian history. I heartily thank the Canadian government for their grant, and Judith Costello, Dr. Clark Cahow, and Patrice LeClerc for their help in my completion of the Canadian research. I must also thank the following archivists for their patience and assistance: George Miles and Susan Bach of the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Yale University; Tom Clark of the Duke University Divinity School Library; Patricia Birkett and Timothy Dubé of the National Archives of Canada; Dorothy Keally, Laurel Parsons, and Terry Thompson of the Anglican Church Archives; Ian Mason of the United Church Archives; the staff of the Archives of Ontario; Ann Yandle of Special Collections and University Archives at the University of British Columbia Library; Brian Moore of the British Columbia Archives; Vernon Leighton at Winona State University. Additionally, I would like to thank John Webster Grant, Jean Friesen, and Robin Fisher for answering what I know they considered to be strange questions. They were all more help than they may ever know.

I owe a special debt of gratitude to my advisors, John Herd Thompson and Peter Wood. They never said no to any of my ideas and let me puzzle them out on my own. I greatly appreciate the freedom that they granted me in this endeavor. Additionally, I would like to thank Frederick Hoxie, Jean Barman, and my colleagues at Texas A&M University: Thomas Dunlap; Larry Yarak, who read various sections of the manuscript and provided invaluable insight into the writing process; and Daniel Bornstein, for suggesting the term redeemable savage. Much of the credit for this completed work goes to Durwood Ball, James Rosenheim, and Julia Kirk Blackwelder. Their comments and insights shaped

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Noble, Wretched, & Redeemable: Protestant Missionaries to the Indians in Canada and the United States, 1820-1900
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter One - The Great Commission 13
  • Chapter Two - Noble Savages and Wretched Indians 31
  • Chapter Three - Speaking in Tongues 61
  • Chapter Four - Many Tender Tithes 103
  • Chapter Five - Courting the Public 131
  • Chapter Six - Let No Man Rend Asunder 159
  • Chapter Seven - "We Are All Savages" 187
  • Conclusion 211
  • Notes 217
  • Bibliography 249
  • Name Index 275
  • Subject Index 279
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