Passages of Retirement: Personal Histories of Struggle and Success

By Richard S. Prentis | Go to book overview

8
Option of 30 Years and Out

Male, 65, married, three children

Education: high school graduate

Job Status: machinist, gauge repair, 30 years with an automobile manufacturer

Retirement Income: $12,000

Health: reported fair

Retirement Category: early-voluntary, retired for 12 years

When I first started working, the job was a means to an end--I had a family to support. When I got my skilled job, I was interested and enjoyed my work. I put my all into it; I gave them eight hours of work.

My job as a repairman brought me into contact with a lot of people and I made a number of friends. When I retired, my friends from the production department and the skilled trades donated to a retirement gift.

When I was working, I really looked forward to retirement. We had our house paid for and the bills were getting paid, so we made the decision that we could retire and live on our income. Retirement meant that we wouldn't have to get up early in the morning and go to work, although I enjoyed my job. The job was getting more difficult because of the training and schooling involved, and at my age of 53, I couldn't comprehend any more.

-41-

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