Passages of Retirement: Personal Histories of Struggle and Success

By Richard S. Prentis | Go to book overview

27
Planning for Retirement

Today, retirement planning has many titles: "Think of Your Future" (an AARP publication), "PREP for Your Future" (Action for Older Persons, Inc.), a joint U.A.W.--G.M. project titled "Design Your Successful Tomorrow," "Creating Your Future Now" and "Life Planning Program" ( Ford Motor Company).

These approaches are similar in content and their focus is on the future. They discuss many of the important issues of living when you retire: financial and living arrangements, leisure, legal and health matters, relationships and adjustments.

The truth of the matter is that many of these significant subjects have been part of your approach to living while you worked. What is called for is a forward look, some redirection and refinement of your thinking for the years ahead. When you retire more attention may be devoted to certain areas--leisure activities and relationships with others.

The benefits of preparation for retirement are overlooked by many. The oversight while one is still employed to think through the possibilities and possible problems is often based on some resistance to the idea of retirement, and a lack of confidence in the ability to plan. This is not to say that detailed preparation is a requisite for everyone. But some awareness of those changes that occur after leaving one's job might well contribute to a person's attitude toward retirement.

The conversations that follow reveal attitudes toward planning and the consequences of this effort. A college instructor covers all bases, including thoughts for living in the later years. His statement, "I see the

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