Passages of Retirement: Personal Histories of Struggle and Success

By Richard S. Prentis | Go to book overview

32
Benefits of Prior Planning

Male, 75, married, 2 children Education: college graduate Job Status: physician, for 40 years Retirement Income: $60,000 Health: reported fair Retirement Category: regular-voluntary, retired for 10 years

Work was my main interest, but I had considered retirement early on, probably after the age of 65. I retired at 65, but this was not my original intention. My plans were to move to California, be semiretired, work two or three days a week. I sold our big home, but, when we were ready to leave my wife backed out. She couldn't leave the family and friends. So, instead of being partially retired, I was forced into complete retirement. I could have gone back into practice at any time. I thought I would try being retired and I found I liked it.

I was successful at my work because it practically satisfied all my needs. There is nothing like the practice of medicine for fulfillment. You are helping yourself, your neighbors, your community and humanity in general. The practice of medicine has changed, more restrictions, more government control, but as far as the enjoyment of the practice of medicine is concerned, it did not change.

My feelings about my work changed a few years before I retired because of my health. I had to cut down on my practice and take it easy because of a heart attack some years ago. Although I maintained my

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