Domestic Law Reforms in Post-Mao China

By Pitman B. Potter | Go to book overview

Contributors

Edward J. Epstein received his B.A., LL.B. and LL.M. degrees from the Australian National University and Columbia University. He is senior lecturer in law in the Faculty of Law, University of Hong Kong, where he teaches Chinese law. He studied Chinese law as an Australian government exchange scholar from 1984 to 1986 at the Chinese People's (Renmin) University in Beijing. He is also a solicitor of the Supreme Courts of the Australian Capital Territory, England and Wales, and Hong Kong. His forthcoming doctoral thesis concerns the reception of Western private law into China.

James V. Feinerman is director of the Committee on Scholarly Communication with China in Washington, DC; he is on leave as professor of law at Georgetown University Law Center and co-director of Georgetown's Joint Program in Law and International Studies (the JD/MSFS program). He has been an exchange student ( 1979-1980) and a Fulbright lecturer on law ( 1982-83) at Peking University, as well as a visiting scholar at the Institute of Law in the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences ( 1980). He is editor-in-chief of the American Bar Association's China Law Reporter and chair of the Committee on Legal Education Exchange with China.

William C. Jones is Charles Nagel Professor of international and comparative law at the Law School of Washington University in St. Louis, MO. He graduated from Yale College and received his law degree from the Harvard Law School and his S.J.D. from the University of Chicago Law School. He is author of Basic Principles of Civil Law in China as well as a number of articles on Chinese law.

Stanley B. Lubman specializes in Chinese law as a practicing lawyer and scholar. He is head of the China Group in the law firm of Allen & Overy and frequently travels from his San Francisco base among his firm's offices in Europe

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