Cubism: A History and An Analysis, 1907-1944

By John Golding | Go to book overview

CHAPTER I
THE HISTORY AND CHRONOLOGY OF CUBISM

When Apollinaire introduced Braque to Picasso towards the end of 1907 he initiated what was to prove one of the most unusual and intensive collaborations in the history of art.

At the time of their meeting, Picasso and Braque had very different positions in the Paris art world. Picasso had already acquired a considerable reputation for himself as an original and independent figure. The works of his so-called 'pink' and 'blue' periods were being bought by important collectors, and the fact that an established dealer like Vollard Was interested in his work gave him additional prestige. With the Demoiselles d'Avignon (Pl. 1), finished shortly before he met Braque, he had produced a painting that was to become one of the cornerstones of twentieth-century art. Braque, on the other hand, although he was only six months younger than Picasso, was slower in his development and had not yet established himself as a particularly original or significant painter; indeed, Braque subsequently came to feel that the paintings he executed in Antwerp during the summer of 1906 were his first creative works.1 Braque enjoyed his first success only in 1907, when the German dealer Wilhelm Uhde bought the Fauve pictures which he exhibited at the Salon des Indépendants.

When he was shown the Demoiselles d'Avignon, Braque appears at first to have been bewildered by it,2 though he realized that it marked an important new departure. Fauvism had by now largely spent itself, and Braque's search during the following years for a more solid foundation for his painting drew him increasingly closer to Picasso. In 1907 Picasso and Braque had been living near each other in Montmartre for some time, and after 1908 began meeting daily to talk, visit the galleries and museums, and to examine each other's

____________________
1
Douglas Cooper, notes to the Catalogue for the Braque exhibition at the Tate Gallery, London 1956, p. 26.
2
Fernande Olivier, Picasso et ses Amis, Paris 1933, p. 120. Braque's remark, quoted by Fernande Olivier, is said to have been made in connection with the Demoiselles.

-19-

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Cubism: A History and An Analysis, 1907-1944
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Acknowledgements 6
  • Abbreviation 6
  • Illustrations 7
  • Introduction 15
  • Chapter I - The History and Chronology of Cubism 19
  • Chapter II - Picasso and Braque 1907-12 47
  • Chapter III - Picasso, Braque and Gris 1912-14 96
  • Chapter IV - The Influence of Cubism in France 1910-14 138
  • Conclusion 181
  • Bibliography 188
  • Index 201
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