The Story Factor: Secrets of Influence from the Art of Storytelling

By Annette Simmons | Go to book overview

9
Storyteller
Dos and Don'ts

I shall never be old enough to speak without embarrassment when I have nothing to talk about.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Icarus wanted to fly. More than anything in the world, he wanted to soar above the heads of his family and friends, earn their admiration, and see things they couldn't see. He spent hours lying on his back watching the birds and dreaming of a day when he might rise above it all. One day he began to build wings of his own. He gathered twigs and feathers and used wax to fashion two beautiful sturdy wings that would, he was sure, make even the birds jealous. His father, seeing his intent, warned him, "Son, fly if you must but never fly too close to the sun. I fear for you.

-199-

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The Story Factor: Secrets of Influence from the Art of Storytelling
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Introduction xv
  • 1 - The Six Stories You Need to Know How to Tell 1
  • 2 - What is Story? 27
  • 3 - What Story Can Do That Facts Can't 49
  • 4 - How to Tell a Good Story 83
  • 5 - The Psychology of Story's Influence 105
  • 6 - Sound Bite or Epic? 133
  • 7 - Influencing the Unwilling, Unconcerned, or Unmotivated 157
  • 8 - Storylistening as a Tool of Influence 181
  • 9 - Storyteller Dos and Don'ts 199
  • 10 - The Life of a Storyteller 219
  • Storytelling in Action - What Impact Do You Want to Have on the World? 241
  • Bibliography 243
  • Index 247
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