Splintered Reflections: Images of the Body in Trauma

By Jean Goodwin; Reina Attias | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 13
A Place to Begin
Images of the Body in Transformation

Reina Attias and Jean Goodwin

The aim of this chapter is to describe exemplary cases in which the reworking of past trauma allowed a beginning resolution of bodily symptoms and body-image problems. These four detailed cases bring together theoretical ways of conceptualizing about the body with examples of clinical interventions. We try as well to link each case with paradigmatic scenes and stories drawn from legends, fairy tales or published historical cases, so that readers can associate vivid eidetic images with four types of body problems: the body in many pieces, the death of the core self, the alien and disruptive body and the body whose interior spaces have been poisoned and ruined. It is likely that many other typologies await discovery and description.

In each of these cases a moment arrives in the therapeutic process in which bodily and psychic experience reconnect in a new way that enhances the collaborative endeavor and makes it more meaningful and effective. Therapeutic developments during and after these recognitions illuminate the prior debilitating impacts of body-image distortion. The observed clinical processes of restoration of body-self functioning and body image seem to echo symbols and themes of bodily transformation found in folklore and art.

The first section describes experiences of bodily disintegration and a body image "in many pieces." Recollection of traumatic memories allowed these patients to re-collect the scattered pieces of the body image. The second problem, death of the core self, is illustrated by a patient who experienced episodic self-cutting and an obsessive belief that someone had been killed in

-287-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Splintered Reflections: Images of the Body in Trauma
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 315

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.