The U.S. Man-Made Fiber Industry: Its Structure and Organization since 1948

By David I. Goldenberg | Go to book overview

5
Structural Determinants

The various U.S. man-made fibers subindustry structures were established and discussed in the prior chapter. Here the aim is to identify and understand the determinants of those structures. Three of many possible structural determinants are particularly important. Technology probably is the most significant determinant of these industry structures. Technology dictates the exact method and the inputs needed. Decisions in these spheres commit a firm for considerable periods, as the earlier discussion of technology showed.

This chapter's focus narrows to two issues: differentiation of firms vying in a particular subindustry, and the cost structures involved in extruding that family of goods. Firm differentiation is examined in the first section below before devoting the bulk of the chapter to the more critical matter of cost structures.


FIRM DIFFERENTIATION

Product heterogeneity was treated extensively above. It should therefore suffice to restate a few key points about man-made fiber heterogeneity as a foundation for other sources of differentiation of U.S. man-made fiber manufacturers. Man-made fibers of a given form within a particular genus generally are not substitutes either for other man-made fibers or for natural fibers. Independence, complementarity, or displacement, as shown earlier, are more common among fibers than substitution. As the various fiber families have low cross-elasticities, interfiber substitution is improbable without relative prices undergoing larger swings for longer periods than have been experienced to date. The absence of such price fluctuations is shown in the next chapter.

One of the main reasons man-made fibers' cross-elasticities are so low is that fiber usually is a small part of the cost of most final products. Carpet is the only large-volume exception. Suits consuming some five pounds of fiber generally retail for well over $100 today, although their constituent fibers'prices normally are below

-79-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The U.S. Man-Made Fiber Industry: Its Structure and Organization since 1948
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 286

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.