German Expressionism and Abstract Art: The Harvard Collections

By Charles L. Kuhn | Go to book overview

PREFACE

The original plan for this publication was to produce a modest check list of the twentieth-century holdings of the Busch-Reisinger Museum of Germanic Culture. It was then wisely suggested that the modern German paintings and sculpture and the extensive collection of German graphic art in the Fogg Museum be included. The collection of illu- strated books in the Department of Graphic Art of the Harvard College Library and the paintings and sculpture by German-born artists in the Harvard Graduate Center were finally added to the scheme.

The collections in the various parts of the University are representative of almost every significant phase of art in Germany during the first half of the twentieth century. It is hoped, therefore, that a complete list of these collections will be useful to students of the subject.

The catalogue includes works not only by men who were born in Germany, but also artists of other nationalities who, in one way or another, were connected with or contributed to the development of the art of that country.

It is a pleasure to express my gratitude to my students and colleagues for their assistance in preparing this catalogue. I am particularly indebted to Professors John Coolidge and Frederick B. Deknatel for their valuable criticism and suggestions. Professor Jakob Rosenberg not only contributed his essay on graphic art but also helped in countless other ways. Professor Peter Selz of Pamona College generously supplied me with data concerning the early years of the Expressionist movement. Professor Walter Gropius, who has been extremely helpful to me for many years, gave me valuable aid in connection with this publication and supplied me with photographs of several of the works of art in the Harvard Graduate Center. Miss Louise Lucas and Miss Ruth Magurn of the Fogg Museum staff were invaluable in their help and unsparing of their time. Special thanks are due to Mrs. Frieda N. Politzer for her patient assistance and many suggestions in preparing the manuscript.

It has been possible to reproduce so many works of art in this catalogue because of the publication fund, largely contributed by members of the Overseers' Committee to Visit the Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures and the Busch-Reisinger Museum. My great appreciation for their generosity is extended to Ralph G. Albrecht, Arthur J. Anderson, Alfred W. Baldwin, Raymond Dennet, Paul E. Geier, Naboth Hedin, Arnold W. Knauth, Neil McElroy, G. Hilmer Lundbeck, Jr., Henry P. McIlhenny, Matthew T. Mellon, John S. Newberry, Jr., LeRoy A. Petersen, Curt H. Reisinger, and Charles H. Watkins. I am deeply grateful to Mr. Neil McElroy, Chairman of the Committee, who took a keen interest in this project and whose vigorous leadership made its publication possible.

CHARLES L. KUHN Busch-Reisinger Museum of Germanic Culture Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts

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German Expressionism and Abstract Art: The Harvard Collections
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • List of Illustrations ix
  • Survey of Modern German Art 1
  • German Graphic Art of the Twentieth Century 19
  • Chronological Tables 31
  • Catalogue of Twentieth Century German Art at Harvard University 37
  • Bibliography 125
  • Biographies 129
  • Index of Artists 149
  • Illustrations *
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