The Future Economic Policy of the United States

By William Adams Brown Jr.; World Peace Foundation | Go to book overview

PREFACE

THE America Looks Ahead series has as its purpose to provide the American public with concise and readable analyses of questions with which the United States will be confronted during the war period and particularly in the years following the war. These analyses are the product of informed and reasoned thinking, but the attempt is made in their actual presentation to avoid the use of technical terms and refinements of thought which might baffle the lay reader. In other words, while the approach in these studies is scholarly, a deliberate attempt is made to present the results of research and logical analysis in such form that interested persons without expert knowledge will be attracted to them.

The studies that have been published thus far in the series have been concerned primarily with the relations of the United States with other countries or geographical areas. Furthermore, with the exception of Economic Defense of Latin America, by Percy W. Bidwell, the emphasis has been on political problems and relations, in the sense in which the word "political" is commonly used. This study breaks new ground, in a sense, so far as this series is concerned, in that it deals with a broad problem of policy cutting across geographical lines, and more particularly with the economic aspects of policy, both in their domestic and foreign applications.

In this study Professor Brown is concerned with the general lines of the future economic policy of the United States. He sees the danger that in seeking to attain objectives which are mutually exclusive, if pushed to their logical

-iii-

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