China Only Yesterday, 1850-1950: A Century of Change

By Emily Hahn | Go to book overview

Chapter Ten

For one reason and another the Reverend Issachar Roberts had for years put off what might be considered the duty of accepting Hung's invitation to come and preach the Word to the Taipings. In the autumn of 1860, however, when it became rather the fashion among foreign missionaries to go to Soochow, only half as far from Shanghai as Nanking, and take a close look at the creatures, Roberts decided at last to run the risk. He found the Ch'en-huan at Soochow and was very well treated by him; after a few days the prince took his guest to Nanking, and Roberts had an audience with the Emperor Hung himself. It was a privilege granted to few persons by that time, and Roberts had only one interview with his former pupil. He stayed on in Nanking for fifteen months. Though a foreign colleague would drop in from time to time and he was not cut off from the Western world, he was not quite easy in his mind. There was polygamy, there was an erratic system of baptism, and Roberts was pained to observe that the original rules of austerity that had governed the Taipings were now all but forgotten, perhaps because the Emperor remained so withdrawn. The soldiers behaved much like any other Chinese soldiers, squabbling over loot and women. "The eccentric but earnest Issachar J. Roberts," as Latourette calls him, must have broken under the strain: it is difficult to account otherwise for what happened at the end of his sojourn.

"In a paroxysm of rage, he fled from the city," says Lindley [ Ti- Ping Tien-Kwoh, p. 567], and all but fell aboard a British gunboat that happened to be lying in the river outside the walls. Weeping hysterically, he told his story. The place he had been living in belonged to one of the Huans, or chiefs, and this Huan had quarreled with one of Roberts's servants, a boy of the age when most young Taiping males were supposed to be serving in the army. The quarrel

-162-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
China Only Yesterday, 1850-1950: A Century of Change
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 4
  • Acknowledgements 7
  • Chapter One 11
  • Chapter Two 28
  • Chapter Three 41
  • Chapter Four 55
  • Chapter Five 71
  • Chapter Six 88
  • Chapter Seven 107
  • Chapter Eight 125
  • Chapter Nine 146
  • Chapter Ten 162
  • Chapter Eleven 183
  • Chapter Twelve 199
  • Chapter Thirteen 217
  • Chapter Fourteen 237
  • Chapter Fifteen 253
  • Chapter Sixteen 278
  • Chapter Seventeen 295
  • Chapter Eighteen 314
  • Chapter Nineteen 332
  • Chapter Twenty 353
  • Chapter Twenty-One 368
  • Chapter Twenty-Two 383
  • Glossary 403
  • Bibliography 407
  • Index 411
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 434

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.