China Only Yesterday, 1850-1950: A Century of Change

By Emily Hahn | Go to book overview

Chapter Eleven

China's new frontier was in Peking. Here East met West every day, and put up such resistance, diplomatically speaking, as was possible. There were distractions of a more familiar nature, domestic problems which did not concern the Westerners: some of these, though threatening, were familiar to the government, and others were far away enough not to worry even the Chinese. One remote trouble was that of Cambodia; in 1863 France had set up a protectorate there, without important repercussions. Closer to home, and therefore more worrying, were the Nien-fei rebels. For a time they had combined with the Taipings, and after the latter were crushed the Nien-fei still troubled a large area, in Anwhei, Honan, Hupei, even Chihli and Shantung. They were fierce fighters, for the most part cavalry, and the Imperialists found them hard to grapple with. Even the favored Li Hung-chang and his colleague, Tso Tsung-t'ang, a very able general who had played a large part in suppressing the Taipings, were unable for a time to cope with the Nien-fei, and were temporarily reduced in rank, this being a commonplace punishment for high officials when things went wrong. Tso at last subjugated the Nien-fei, after which he went straight back into battle against the Mohammedans of the Northwest. They were a chronic threat. Early in the century, at the borders of Chinese Turkestan, a scion of the chieftain family of Hodjas, named Jehangir, had led an uprising against Peking which spread quickly through the Mohammedan communities of China. After a hard fight it was put down, and Jehangir was executed in Peking in 1828, from which date there were only two minor rebellions among the Mohammedans until the time of the Taipings. Then, with the Peking government concentrating all its energy against Hung's followers, the Mohammedans saw their chance and rose again. They wrought havoc in Shensi and

-183-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
China Only Yesterday, 1850-1950: A Century of Change
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 4
  • Acknowledgements 7
  • Chapter One 11
  • Chapter Two 28
  • Chapter Three 41
  • Chapter Four 55
  • Chapter Five 71
  • Chapter Six 88
  • Chapter Seven 107
  • Chapter Eight 125
  • Chapter Nine 146
  • Chapter Ten 162
  • Chapter Eleven 183
  • Chapter Twelve 199
  • Chapter Thirteen 217
  • Chapter Fourteen 237
  • Chapter Fifteen 253
  • Chapter Sixteen 278
  • Chapter Seventeen 295
  • Chapter Eighteen 314
  • Chapter Nineteen 332
  • Chapter Twenty 353
  • Chapter Twenty-One 368
  • Chapter Twenty-Two 383
  • Glossary 403
  • Bibliography 407
  • Index 411
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 434

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.