Please update your browser

You're using a version of Internet Explorer that isn't supported by Questia.
To get a better experience, go to one of these sites and get the latest
version of your preferred browser:

No Magic Bullet: A Social History of Venereal Disease in the United States since 1880

By Allan M. Brandt | Go to book overview

NTRODUCTION
Sex, Disease, and Medicine

The most remarkable change in patterns of health during the last century has been the largely successful conquest of infectious disease. Less than one hundred years ago diphtheria, tuberculosis, pneumonia, typhoid, and dysentery constituted this nation's greatest health threats; epidemics could devastate a city or town with tragic speed. In 1918 an outbreak of Spanish influenza claimed more victims than did combat in World War I. 1day these diseases are largely under control if not virtually unknown. Although there is considerable debate about the reasons for the decline of these infections -- some credit medical advances while others have stressed a rising standard of living, better nutrition, and natural changes in the host-parasite relationship -- there is no doubt that we have much less to fear from infectious disease than we did even a generation ago. 2

Yet, strikingly, venereal diseases are inadequately controlled, if controlled at all. Given the power of the contemporary media, it seems impossible to be unaware of the current problem. Herpes, a viral infection that is often transmitted sexually, is according to most reports epidemic, affecting perhaps as many as 20 million Americans. With no effective treatments available, it threatens to become endemic. Even more ominous is the new disease known as Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Found primarily among homosexual males, in most cases this disease poses a lethal threat. Again, there is no known effective treatment. Yet even syphilis and gonorrhea, diseases for which cures have been developed, remain in dramatically high proportions. Gonorrhea constitutes the most prevalent bacterial infection on earth, with over one hundred million cases occurring annually; more than two million of which occur in the United States. 3 Why, if we have been successful in fighting infectious disease in this century, have we been unable to deal effectively with venereal disease?

To answer this question, we must examine venereal disease not only as a biological entity, but as a disease that has engaged certain attitudes and values; beliefs about its causes and consequences that in turn affect responses to the problem. A society's response to those who are ill, its employment of medical discoveries and resources, is closely related to its most basic assumptions and

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
No Magic Bullet: A Social History of Venereal Disease in the United States since 1880
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 266

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.