Meister Eckhart, the Essential Sermons, Commentaries, Treatises, and Defense

By Edmund Colledge; Bernard McGinn et al. | Go to book overview
Save to active project

2. THEOLOGICAL SUMMARY

A. PRINCIPLES OF INTERPRETATION

Perhaps the only real consensus among students of Eckhart is that he is not an easy author to read. The widely divergent, frequently erroneous uses to which he has been put spring almost as much from the manner of his presentation as they do from the profundity of what he has to say. Not all of this can be blamed on the Meister himself. The condition of the text of his surviving works is partly at fault. The Latin works exist in only a few manuscripts and comprise a fragment of what Eckhart intended to write. The German treatises and sermons come down to us in over two hundred manuscripts, but with texts so faulty and problems of authenticity so serious that over a century of scholarship has still not solved all the issues. Nevertheless, the excellent critical edition of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, now well past its fortieth year, provides a solid starting point both for the translations found here and for penetration of Eckhart's meaning.

Meister Eckhart was not only a highly trained philosopher and theologian, but also a preacher, a poet, and a punster who deliberately cultivated rhetorical effects, bold paradoxes, and unusual metaphors, neologisms, and wordplay to stir his readers and hearers from their intellectual and moral slumber. If even the technical Latin of his scholastic works at times displays these characteristics, how much more true this is for the vernacular texts. Generations of scholars have admired the Meister as one of the crucial figures in the development of German, especially with regard to its speculative vocabulary, and have praised him as a master of German prose. 1 While Eckhart's creative handling of language is one of the major attractions of his style, it often does not make the task of understanding him any easier. Nevertheless, the Meister's style is both attractive and difficult primarily because of

-24-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Meister Eckhart, the Essential Sermons, Commentaries, Treatises, and Defense
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 366

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.