Meister Eckhart, the Essential Sermons, Commentaries, Treatises, and Defense

By Edmund Colledge; Bernard McGinn et al. | Go to book overview

5:17). Therefore whoever sows in the flesh inordinate love will reap everlasting death, and whoever in the spirit sows a well-ordered love will from the spirit reap everlasting life ( Ga. 6:8). So it is that the sooner a man shuns what is created, the sooner will the creator come to him. So take heed, all you reasonable people! Since the delight we might have in Christ's bodily image deprives us of receptivity for the Holy Spirit, how much more shall we be deprived of God by the ill-ordered delight that we take in transient consolations! So detachment is the best of all, for it purifies the soul and cleanses the conscience and enkindles the heart and awakens the spirit and stimulates our longings and shows us where God is and separates us from created things and unites itself with God.

Now, all you reasonable people, take heed! The fastest beast that will carry you to your perfection is suffering, for no one will enjoy more eternal sweetness than those who endure with Christ in the greatest bitterness. There is nothing more gall-bitter than suffering, and nothing more honey-sweet than to have suffered; nothing disfigures the body more than suffering, and nothing more adorns the soul in the sight of God than to have suffered. The firmest foundation on which this perfection can stand is humility, for whichever mortal crawls here in the deepest abasement, his spirit will fly up into the highest realms of the divinity, for love brings sorrow, and sorrow brings love. And therefore, whoever longs to attain to perfect detachment, let him struggle for perfect humility, and so he will come close to the divinity.

That we may all be brought to this, may that supreme detachment help us which is God himself. Amen.

-294-

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Meister Eckhart, the Essential Sermons, Commentaries, Treatises, and Defense
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Classics of Western Spirituality *
  • The Classics of Western Spirituality a Library of the Great Spiritual Masters *
  • Meister Eckhart - The Essential Sermons, Commentaries, Treatises, and Defense *
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xi
  • Foreword xvii
  • Introduction *
  • Key to Abbreviations *
  • 1. Historical Data 5
  • 2. Theological Summary 24
  • 3. a Note on Eckhart's Works and the Present Selections 62
  • Part One Latin Works 68
  • 1. Documents Relating to Eckhart's Condemnation *
  • 2. Selections from the Commentaries on Genesis 82
  • 3. Selections from the Commentary on John 122
  • Part Two German Works *
  • 1. Selected Sermons *
  • 2. Treatises 209
  • Notes 294
  • Bibliography 349
  • Index to Preface, Introduction and Notes 354
  • Index to Text 360
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