Executive Governance: Presidential Administrations and Policy Change in the Federal Bureaucracy

By Cornell G. Hooton | Go to book overview

Notes

Preface
1.
Some better known views are in Cronin ( 1970), Nathan ( 1975, 1983), and Neustadt ( 1990).
2.
Sources are Malbin ( 1981), Cronin ( 1984), and OMB ( 1990).
3.
Aberbach ( 1991) reports that some 5 percent of civil servants in a 1970 survey spoke of "weekly or more" contact with White House people, but the picture appears to have changed in some ways. In a 1986-87 set of interviews, 20 percent of top-level civil servants spoke of such contact while 3 percent of lower-level supergrade civil servants spoke of such contact. Less closely examined was the nature of the contact itself, which other research suggests has become less substantive ( Campbell 1986).

Chapter 1 Introduction
1.
Niskanen ( 1971, 1975), Halperin ( 1974), Weaver ( 1979), Rector and Sanera ( 1987), Rourke ( 1984a).
2.
Respondents giving their careerists a four or five on a five-point scale. The data is from the National Academy of Public Administration's Appointee Survey Data Base, Presidential Appointee Project.
3.
By contrast, a 1982 survey of Federal Executive Institute alumni asked respondents to scale "the importance" of each of thirteen constituent categories. "Elected Officials" received the lowest mean across respondents, followed by "Staff of Elected Official" (first and second, respectively, were "Employees [Subordinates]" and "Clients/Consumers"; Schmidt and Posner 1986, 449). Unfortunately, the piece leaves "the importance" nebulous and, significantly, provides no breakdown of "Elected Officials" into presidential and congressional categories.
4.
Drawing on open-ended interviews of careerists in selected agencies, Campbell (1986, 203-212) reports that 38 percent and 75 percent of respondents

-207-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Executive Governance: Presidential Administrations and Policy Change in the Federal Bureaucracy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 254

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.