Ideologies, Goals, and Values

By Feliks Gross | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

An attempt to encompass ideologies, goals, and values in a single study, within the same frame of reference, was for me a difficult attempt. At the beginning, it seemed that there was not a single, organizing principle and that a better way, if not the only one, was to present this theme in a number of independent, separate papers, essays bound together in one collection rather than a systematic study. The frame of reference was, however, a workable one. Here was the problem of organization of the material gathered over years of study and research.

Dr. James T. Sabin of the Greenwood Press, was indeed very helpful and encouraging in those discussions on integrating and reducing the subject matter. I appreciate his interest in this project, his tactful patience (the manuscript took several years), and above all his penetrating insight into the difficult issues of the major theme and clear comments. Thanks are given also to Mary Walker and Mildred Vasan at Greenwood for careful editing and unusual attention to detail.

Don Martindale's personal qualities, his literary talent, and broad, as well as subtle, humanistic approach and philosophy of social sciences were well expressed not only in his witty and brilliant comments but also in his sharp and at the same time friendly and constructive criticism. I appreciate his careful reading; his comments were very helpful in reducing and at the same time integrating and focusing this volume.

Since the beginning of my work on this subject, I found a friendly interest and criticism among my colleagues at Brooklyn College and later at the Graduate School of the City University of New York, beginning with my friends Walter Dyke, who was noted for his work on the Navajos, and Robert Erich, anthropologist and archeologist. Dyke took interest in my comparative approach to value study, based on field research--though I did not realize, at that time, how many years it takes. Bob Erich edited and discussed my early work on Arapaho values (published later in "Ethnos", University of Wyoming Publications, International Journal of American Linguistics

-xxxiii-

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Ideologies, Goals, and Values
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Sociology Series Editor: Don Martindale ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures and Tables vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Introduction xxi
  • Acknowledgments xxxiii
  • Part I Ideologies 1
  • 1: The Directive and Regulatory System 3
  • 2: Ideologies--The World Outlook and Values 26
  • 3: The Structure of Ideologies 44
  • 4: The Appeal and Function of Values 58
  • 5: Definition of Values 71
  • Part II Goals 75
  • 6: Types of Goals 77
  • 7: Formation of Goals 91
  • 8: Horizontal Sequence of Goals 103
  • 9: Strategies 119
  • 10: Social Planning and Ethics 128
  • 11: The Logic of Planning 145
  • 12: Distant Goals 156
  • 13: Social Rhythm and Cyclical Goals 183
  • Part III Values 209
  • 14: Hierarchies of Values 211
  • 15: Multiple Sets of Values 237
  • 16: In Search of Universal Values 273
  • 17: Toleration and Pluralism 300
  • Bibliography 321
  • Index 337
  • About the Author 345
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