Ideologies, Goals, and Values

By Feliks Gross | Go to book overview

11
The Logic of Planning

The Question Asked
Every one of us does some individual, personal planning all the time. What does such planning involve? In terms of our common sense we ask at first the right kind of questions: what shall be done and why? Here are typical steps of choice, decision, and action: (1) the present situation is discussed and problems are evaluated in terms of priorities; (2) goals are identified; (3) means to reach the goal are considered; (4) a decision is made; (5) actions toward goal achievement are carried out. This path of thinking and doing is not necessarily conscious, but there is a logical pattern that we will follow.In social planning the sequence is alike, but questions have to be asked and answered all the time.Thus, a planning project can be reduced to answers to four major questions:
What is the situation now? What is the problem?
What should be done and for whom, in order to respond to the problem? What are the priorities and our goals in this case?
How can we do it? What are the means, or
Preferred courses of action?
How much will it cost?

The last is a question of allocation of resources, identification of sources of financial as well as of other forms of assistance.

In consequence of a general analysis the planner identifies the problem and assigns top priorities for problem solving. The key issue has to be located.

The next question (goals) concerns the product of planning. The goal of planning is a product that consists of a subject and an object. The subject of

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