Yankee Doodle-Doo: A Collection of Songs of the Early American Stage

By Grenville Vernon | Go to book overview

WILLIAM H. FRY

Leonora

WILLIAM H. FRY was the music critic of the New York Tribune, and his opera "Leonora" was probably the first grand opera by an American given a public representation. Mr. Fry's brother, J. R. Fry wrote the libretto, and the opera was first performed in Philadelphia at the Chestnut Street Theatre on June 4, 1845. The cast was as follows—Valdor, Mr. Ritchings; Montalvo, Mr. Seguin; Alferez, Mr. Brunton; Julio, Mr. Frazer; Leonora, Mrs. Seguin; Mariana, Miss Ince. "Leonora" left American grand opera about where it was before, and, it must be confessed, about where it has remained up to the present day. Mr. Fry did not prove to be the genius who was to show that a school of native grand opera is possible, and like the audience of that far away night in the forties we are still waiting for that genius's advent!

-[130]-

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Yankee Doodle-Doo: A Collection of Songs of the Early American Stage
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Yankee Doodle-Doo *
  • The Introduction 5
  • The Contents 9
  • The Illustrations *
  • Thomas Godfrey 15
  • Andrew Barton 16
  • Royal Tyler 23
  • John Leacock 25
  • Ann Kemble Hatton 29
  • Mrs. Susanna Rowson 32
  • Elihu Hubbard Smith 35
  • William Milns 40
  • John Beete 43
  • William Dunlap 45
  • Benjamin Carr 50
  • Laurence Sterne 58
  • James Hewitt 64
  • Victor Pellesier 70
  • James Hewitt 80
  • James Nelson Barker 83
  • James Ellison 90
  • Anonymous 92
  • Joseph Hutton 93
  • Charles Powell Clinch 98
  • Samuel B. H. Judah 101
  • Micah Hawkins 104
  • Samuel Woodworth 107
  • C. S. Talbot 119
  • John Howard Payne 121
  • Anonymous 127
  • Robert Dale Owens 128
  • William H. Fry 130
  • Benjamin A. Baker 132
  • James Gaspard Maeder 134
  • J. H. Wainwright 139
  • Charles M. Walcot 142
  • 0. F. Durivage 144
  • James Pilgrim 145
  • Thomas Dunn English 151
  • C. W. Taylor 154
  • John Brougham 156
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