The Rise of the European Economy: An Economic History of Continental Europe from the Fifteenth to the Eighteenth Century

By Hermann Kellenbenz; Gerhard Benecke | Go to book overview

Introduction

CONTINENTAL EUROPE AS AN ECONOMIC AREA

There is no satisfactory definition of the term 'continental Europe' that will fit the facts and events of economic history. A purely geographical definition cannot help much, for it would include the whole continent of Europe without the British Isles. A better approach seems to be to consider the continent and its economic connections with the seas surrounding it, and then to take into account the varying influences of the chief economic centres and lines of communication.

From the late fifteenth century onwards the Atlantic side of Europe became particularly important as a result of the great discoveries and changes in world trade routes. First Spain and Portugal, then the whole area from the Bay of Biscay along the French coast to the Netherlands, became the centre of gravity. In particular, the Netherlands benefited from an extremely favourable position for trade and from the effects of the revolt against the Spanish state. The North Sea area, that is the British Isles and the coast from Dutch Friesland to Jutland and Norway, should also be included in this economic centre.

The Atlantic seaboard of Europe had its own hinterland, which included parts of France, especially along the Garonne, Loire and Seine. It drew on the border region east of the lie de France along the Maas, Scheldt and Rhine, reaching deep into Germany. It also influenced parts of Westphalia and Lower Saxony, stretching along the Rivers Weser and Elbe as far as

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The Rise of the European Economy: An Economic History of Continental Europe from the Fifteenth to the Eighteenth Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Rise of the European Economy *
  • Contents *
  • Foreword *
  • Introduction *
  • Part One- The Economic Development of Continental Europe 1500- 1630 *
  • I- Population Movements *
  • II- Organization of Production *
  • III- Production *
  • IV- Service Industries *
  • V- Prices and Wages *
  • Part Two- The Economic Development of Continental Europe 1630-1750 194
  • I- Intellectual Movements *
  • II- Population Movements *
  • III- State Planning and the Economy *
  • IV- Production *
  • Service Industries *
  • VI- Money, Credit and Insurance *
  • VII- Conclusion *
  • Select Bibliography *
  • Index *
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