The Rise of the European Economy: An Economic History of Continental Europe from the Fifteenth to the Eighteenth Century

By Hermann Kellenbenz; Gerhard Benecke | Go to book overview

III State Planning and the
Economy

Entrepreneurs and workers were strongly influenced by paternalist state supervision in continental Europe, especially in the France of the mercantilist Colbert. He formed a conseil du commerce in 1664 to centralize control over manufacturing industries, their workshops and marketing outlets under Bellinzani, who was named the first inspector-general of factories. Various entrepreneurs were given state development aid; Camuset, for instance, for large-scale production of knitted goods, the brothers Dalliez for foundries and mining works, Madame de la Petitière for lace and embroidery works. All workshops were expected to follow state regulations, and many undertakings were owned by the crown, among them the tapestry works of Paris (Gobelins and Savonnerie) and Beauvais and the arsenals at Brest, Toulon and Rochefort. State-backed enterprises often marked their products 'by royal appointments'. Italian specialists in glass, mirror, lace and other luxury manufacture were imported, as were miners, foundry-workers and tin-plate makers from Sweden and Germany and weavers from Holland, among them Van Robais, who built a factory for fine cloth in Abbeville on English models. The flight of French skilled workers was forbidden by severe state punishment. A regulation in 1682 threatened workers who tried to leave the country with death. In 1665 Colbert sent master-weavers to Bourges to improve the textile industry. The intendant had a stocking and woollen cap workshop built in Poitiers and a leather workshop in Chatellerault. Workshops were set up in poor houses and hospitals. The poverty hospital at Bordeaux made stockings, lace and carded wool.

The state often provided entrepreneurs with interest-free loans and even with land, buildings and equipment at initially

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The Rise of the European Economy: An Economic History of Continental Europe from the Fifteenth to the Eighteenth Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Rise of the European Economy *
  • Contents *
  • Foreword *
  • Introduction *
  • Part One- The Economic Development of Continental Europe 1500- 1630 *
  • I- Population Movements *
  • II- Organization of Production *
  • III- Production *
  • IV- Service Industries *
  • V- Prices and Wages *
  • Part Two- The Economic Development of Continental Europe 1630-1750 194
  • I- Intellectual Movements *
  • II- Population Movements *
  • III- State Planning and the Economy *
  • IV- Production *
  • Service Industries *
  • VI- Money, Credit and Insurance *
  • VII- Conclusion *
  • Select Bibliography *
  • Index *
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