Judaism Eternal: Selected Essays from the Writings of Samson Raphael Hirsch - Vol. 1

By I. Grunfeld; Samson Raphael Hirsch | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IV
TEBETH

The Tenth of Tebeth--The Wanderdoom (Galuth) of the Jewish people and its Significance.

THE Tenth of Tebeth is the first of the four fasts which perpetuate amongst Jews the memory of their twice-suffered catastrophe, the downfall of the Jewish State.

This memorial is no mere form.

You are not invited to a merely idle mourning, to look back a little, to tic crêpe on your sleeve, and to dedicate a tear of sadness to the departed great. The anniversaries of the fall of Jerusalem and Zion find you fasting. This fasting beckons you on. It reminds you that Jerusalem and Zion have not fallen for ever. It reminds you that it lies in your hands to make "the fast of the fourth month and the fast of the fifth and the fast of the seventh and the fast of the tenth month to become to the House of Judah days of joy and delight". ( Zechariah 8. 19.) It reminds you that you have but to will it and Jerusalem and Zion will rise again.

For look, you fast on these days of remembrance in order to tell yourself that your fate and your life's task are still linked with this catastrophe, and you have to go on repeating this fast until your destiny is fulfilled and until you can comprehend and accomplish your life's task.

Your fate is called "Galuth" and your life's task "Teshubah."

When on such days of remembrance you look back on the last two thousand years of your history--and you belong to the only race of mankind now living which can look back to the fourth millennium of its history--what a glorious picture meets your eyes! Everywhere at home, yet everywhere a stranger, everywhere a stranger yet everywhere at home--mixing in the affairs of all peoples yet not taking root in them, in its thoughts and feelings, hopes and fears, movements and activities belonging to every period yet transcending every period, taking part actively in the cares and strivings of the other peoples yet

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Judaism Eternal: Selected Essays from the Writings of Samson Raphael Hirsch - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Table of Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Samson Raphael Hirsch--The Man And His Mission xiii
  • Bibliography xlix
  • Part I - Reflections on The Jewish Calendar Year 1
  • Chapter II - Cheshvan 15
  • Chapter III - Kislev 20
  • Chapter IV - Tebeth 29
  • Chapter V - Shebat 35
  • Chapter VI Adar 47
  • Chapter VII - Nisan 57
  • Chapter IX - Sivan 88
  • Chapter X - Tammuz 117
  • Chapter XI - Av 126
  • Chapter XII - Elul Shofar and Selichoth 142
  • Part II - Jewish Education 153
  • Chapter XIV - Religious Instruction 160
  • Chapter XV - On the Place of Ethical Training in School Education 174
  • Chapter XVI - On Hebrew Instruction As Part of a General Education 188
  • Chapter XVII - The Relation of General To Specially Jewish Education 203
  • Part III - Educational Talks 221
  • Chapter XVIII - Educational Talks 223
  • Educational Talks 232
  • Index of Subjects 253
  • Index to Passages Cited 268
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