Aidos: The Psychology and Ethics of Honour and Shame in Ancient Greek Literature

By Douglas L. Cairns | Go to book overview

PREFACE

THERE is clearly a great need for a comprehensive study of the concept of aidōs in Greek literature; the importance of the concept is apparent to anyone who has read at all widely in epic or tragedy, yet understanding of its essence is hindered, even among specialists, by the complexity which emerges once one appreciates the range of situations in which the relevant terms occur and the range of attitudes and responses which they are able to convey. While there does exist a number of limited studies, particularly of aidōs in Homer and of its meaning in crucial passages of Hesiod and Euripides, which are often very useful, the only comprehensive study made in the present century is that of von Erffa ( 1937), and, in spite of the merits of this work in many of its interpretations of individual passages, its overall approach is too disjointed to be helpful.

My aim, then, has been to provide the comprehensive overview which would assist as many as possible of those who might wish to gain some understanding of this important concept. In the absence of any other full and detailed modern study, I felt it best not just to concentrate on the isolation of generic characteristics of aidōs, but to investigate in detail the work of the concept in individual passages of individual works by individual authors, both in order that the work should be of use as a work of reference to students and scholars of Classics, who might wish to discover what I have to say about aidōs in some important passage or in some work in which it plays a significant role, and in order that a work which, I hope, will lay the groundwork for future studies of aidōs could not be accused of over-simplification or of glossing over the details. The book, however, is not solely or even principally intended as a work of reference, but as a contribution to the major areas of study in which an understanding of aidōs is important, and so I have tried, as far as possible, to keep in mind the interests of students and scholars in the fields of Greek intellectual history, Greek popular morality or values, Greek literature, and Greek philosophy. Accordingly, while the work as a whole addresses questions of interest to those Greek scholars of an intellectual-historical, social anthropological bent, it is to be hoped that its parts may be useful in more diverse ways, as limited contributions to, say, literary interpretation of Homer or tragedy, or philosophical interpretation of Plato and Aristotle.

-vii-

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Aidos: The Psychology and Ethics of Honour and Shame in Ancient Greek Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xiii
  • Abbreviations xv
  • Introduction 1
  • I - Aidōs in Homer 48
  • 2 - From Hesiod to the Fifth Century 147
  • 3 - Aeschylus 178
  • 4 - Sophocles 215
  • 5 - Euripides 265
  • 6 - The Sophists, Plato, and Aristotle 343
  • Epilogue 432
  • References 435
  • Index of Principal Passages 459
  • General Index 472
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