INTRODUCTION

Prometheus' drama is eternal. The Prometheus myth speaks to Western man today. The prototype of the rebel, Prometheus sought to conquer a past that no longer answered his needs and to dominate a present that might otherwise have engulfed him. According to some legends, Prometheus created man out of earth; but because man was imperfect Zeus sought to destroy him and bring forth a new race. Prometheus, who looked upon humanity with compassion, could not stand by and allow such annihilation. By stealing fire from Zeus and giving it to mankind, he prevented the massacre. Fire became the source of man's discoveries and enabled him, so it was thought, to master nature. Civilization resulted: the birth of rational concepts, the alphabet, the arts, mathematics, astronomy, agriculture, metallurgy, medicine, and so on. As a fine psychologist, Prometheus knew that hope was an important factor in helping man experience a positive life process. He therefore endowed him with a sense of illusion, thus relieving him from feelings of perpetual discouragement that might accrue from recognizing the absurdity of his condition. He also instilled in man the meaning and value of energy, action, ambition, liberty--all of which give purpose to his life struggle. After Prometheus' theft of fire, he and Zeus became overt antagonists. The father of the Gods represented archaic order, an intransigence of spirit, an inhuman attitude toward man. To battle with Zeus indicated courage and hubris. Prometheus was conscious of the struggle his bold act entailed and accepted his punishment with spiritual and physical dignity. He was nailed to a rock on a mountain peak in Scythia and thus exiled from humanity. He was then hurled into Tartarus, and later tied to a mountain crag in the Caucasus where an eagle sent by Zeus ate out his liver by day, which then regenerated at night. Prometheus' battle with Zeus was not one-sided, however. Prometheus' mother revealed to him the secret of Zeus' downfall. It was said that one of Zeus' paramours would give birth to a son thirteen generations hence who would overthrow his father.

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Prometheus Syndrome
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • By the Same Author ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Table of Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 10
  • Chapter 1: Prometheus 11
  • Notes 49
  • Section I Man as Creator *
  • Introduction to Section I 51
  • Chapter 2: Albertus Magnus 55
  • Chapter 3: Paracelsus 75
  • Chapter 4: Rabbi Judah Loew 97
  • Chapter 5: Goethe's Faustian Physics and Metaphysics (1749-1832) 133
  • Section II the Ordeal of Reason *
  • Introduction to Section II 155
  • Chapter 6: Voltaire's MicromÉgas 161
  • Chapter 7: Balzac's in Search of the Absolute (1799-1850) 185
  • Chapter 8: Hermann Hesse 207
  • Section III Toward Integration *
  • Introduction to Section III 237
  • Chapter 9: Malraux 239
  • Conclusion 267
  • Selected Bibliography 271
  • Index 279
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 290

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.