Human-Computer Interaction: Ergonomics and User Interfaces - Vol. 1

By Hans-Jörg Bullinger; Jürgen Ziegler | Go to book overview

Computer Usability Problems and
Psychological Well-being

Leino T., Ristimäki T., Huuhtanen P.
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health


1
Introduction

In this paper, the key psychological question concerning new technology is the good usability of computer applications. The key question arises from the fact that, although we nowadays often use computers in our work, the work is always work with the mind or by the mind ( Hollnagel 1997). This means that computer applications should be optimal from the user's point of view, so that the user can carry out the required tasks successfully and without difficulty. ( Mitchell & al. 1997, Izso & Zijstra 1997).

Most of the empirical studies on psychological well-being at work have shown that control over one's work and social support improve psychological wellbeing ( Karasek 1979). Previous studies have nevertheless shown that in work environments where information technology and computers are important, the good usability of computer applications can improve the worker's psychological well-being and job satisfaction ( Harrison & al. 1994, Izso & Zijstra 1997).

In Call Center work the customer service employees use the latest information and telecommunication technology. They provide a variety of sales, marketing and information services remotely by telephone connected to computer applications ( Richardson and Marshall 1996). There is no face-to-face contact with the customer. The employee is able to discuss, on the phone the best possibilities to solve the customer's problems. The action that the customer service employee then takes, depends on the employee's understanding of the customer's problem and possibilities to find a solution by using the application quickly for finding all the information needed.

-11-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Human-Computer Interaction: Ergonomics and User Interfaces - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 1356

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.