Human-Computer Interaction: Ergonomics and User Interfaces - Vol. 1

By Hans-Jörg Bullinger; Jürgen Ziegler | Go to book overview

Influences of Ergo-meter Work Load Stimulated
Fluctuations in CFF Values of
Circadian Rhythm on VDU Work Load Related
Central Nerve Fatigue

Masahau Takeda and Satoru Kishino
Department of Industrial Engineering Musashi Institute of Technology
1-28-1 Tamazutsumi Setagaya-Ku, Tokyo, Japan 158-8557


1. Objectives of this study

VDT activities have penetrated into all aspects of society to present a problem in modern society by causing such health hazards as central nerve fatigue and dysfunctions of shoulders, jaws and arms. One such problem is fatigue caused by overall lack of exercise due to the static nature of VDT activities. One suggested countermeasure to combat this problem is to separate VDT activities into 60-minute intervals with a 50-minute working time and a 10-minute recess. Seated operator produces blood circulation failure through out the body and as a result, activity of the central nervous systems deteriorates. Of break spend it, and pointer of a person is not instructed for VDT operator. The VDT operator has not been instructed on what to do during the rest period. So we drew up a hypothesis that lightening of the central nervous system fatigue could be achieved by a light overall body exercise, to be completed during the rest period. The objective of this study is to promote activation during the recess period by implementing ergo-meter work loading in order to relieve poor localized blood circulation and stimulate the monotonousness of VDT activities. Experiments were conducted under the hypothesis that central nerve fatigue may thus be reduced. Since the author et al have found in previous studies that monitoring fluctuations in CFF values was an easy and effective method for measuring fatigue, it was used in this experiment as an index. The experiment was planned taking into account special considerations for the influences that CFF values have on circadian rhythm.

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