Human-Computer Interaction: Ergonomics and User Interfaces - Vol. 1

By Hans-Jörg Bullinger; Jürgen Ziegler | Go to book overview
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OCR-Oriented Automatic Document Orientation Correcting Technique for Mobile Image Scanners

Kenichiro Sakai, Tsugio Noda
Fujitsu Laboratories, Ltd.
E-mail: ksakai@flab.fujitsu.co.jp, noda@flab.fujitsu.co.jp


1
Introduction

The progressive miniaturization of notebook personal computers and the spread of communication tools such as portable phones, e-mail, and the Internet have accelerated the mobile use of notebook personal computers. This enables us to gather digital image data and transmit it to another person or appliances in the mobile environment.

The use of the digital still camera has been increasingly widespread all over the world. It is suitable for taking a picture of a 3D object, e.g. landscape, but is unsuitable for capturing paper documents because of the lack of scanning resolution. Furthermore, the demands for clipping and collecting document information outside the home and office have been dramatically increasing in recent years.


2
Background

To meet the increased demands for clipping and collecting articles from any type of paper document such as newspapers, magazines, and business papers even when we are away from home or the office, we developed a highperformance mobile image scanner, called "Pen Scanner", which is extremely small (183(W) x 17.6(D) x 14.7(H) mm) and lightweight (80g), and scans documents with high resolution (400dpi) and at high speed (less than 3sec/A6).

In this development, we aimed to achieve orientation-less easy scanning, which enables users to scan a document in any direction they like without any instructions to the computer. We would like to introduce an improved technique, focused upon the user interface of the mobile image scanner.

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