Human-Computer Interaction: Ergonomics and User Interfaces - Vol. 1

By Hans-Jörg Bullinger; Jürgen Ziegler | Go to book overview

An Easy Internet Browsing System with
Sophisticated Human Interface Using 3-D
Graphics

Kimiyoshi Machii, Shigeru Matsuo, Yoshitaka Atarashi,
Satoko Kojima*, Masahiro Yaezawa*, Kazuyoshi Koga,
Yasuhiro Nakatsuka and Koyo Katsura
Hitachi Research Laboratory, * Design Center, Hitachi Ltd., Japan.


1
Introduction

Recently, the number of internet users is increasing. Messages are sent by email and information is gotten from the WWW ( World Wide Web) by HTTP (HyperText Transfer Protocol). Although most users do these tasks with a personal computer (PC) on their desks, the desire for "non-desktop" computers is also increasing. With "non-desktop" computers, people will be able to access the internet while sitting in their cars or walking around town. These situations will be realized soon by high-speed communication technologies.

On the other hand, several electronic products for accessing the internet have been developed. Some of them are special for the internet, others have embedded add-on functions to access the internet. These are home game machines, mobile telephones, car navigation systems and so on. We focused on a "non-desktop" internet browsing system as a successor to car navigation systems.

As the market grows, functions of car navigation systems are improving. Since 1997, network services for cars have become available. Using the services, drivers can get area information about restaurants, parking areas, amusement parks and so on. However, these services have been supplementary to the car navigation function. We think it is now time for such services to become a main function of car information systems. A network-based system does not need any external media such as CDs or DVD-ROMs whose contents are soon out of date. Besides, information got from the network is not the only thing provided, maps and/or routes to the target place are supplied.

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