Human-Computer Interaction: Ergonomics and User Interfaces - Vol. 1

By Hans-Jörg Bullinger; Jürgen Ziegler | Go to book overview
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Influence of Delay Time in Remote Camera Control

Katsumi TAKADA, Hiroshi TAMURA, Yu SHIBUYA
KYOTO INSTITUTE of TECHNOLOGY


1
Introduction

Although recent technological advances promise new possibilities for image communication, its full potential has not yet been adequately measured. It is vital to determine how users actually respond to interactive systems by studying the operating procedures of image communication.

In studying the image communication process, it is essential to examine camera control methods. Camera control in TV conferencing will allow participants to make variety of interaction among them [ H.Tamura, et al. 1997]. In remote camera control, however, delay time makes visual feedback operation difficult [ Hoffman, E. R. 1992]. In order to overcome this problem, camera control is made constant, and time duration of motion is quantumized (pulse operation).

Primarily, the combination of the delay time and camera movement speed determines an operator's effectiveness. Reducing superficial speed of camera view and using global view are effective way of enhancing remote camera operation were mentioned [ M. Murata et al. 1997].

In this study, the remote camera control system is built on the Ethernet. Then the influence of delay time on remote camera is examined.


2
Experiment

In order to clarify the influence of delay time in remote camera control, three kinds of experiments were done. In each experiment, 13 examinees operate a remote camera with clicking a button on CRT.

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