Human-Computer Interaction: Ergonomics and User Interfaces - Vol. 1

By Hans-Jörg Bullinger; Jürgen Ziegler | Go to book overview

Customer Segmentation and Interface Design
Hans Schedl, Horst Penzkofer, Heinz Schmalholz
Ifo Institute for Economic Research, Munich ( Germany)
1
Introductory Notes and Definitions
More and more business interactions are moving onto electronic networks like the intemet. Forrester Research sees the increase in online retail sales in the US expanding from $2.4bn in 1997 ( 1998 estimates $7.8bn) up to $108bn by 2003. Similar growth rates have been estimated for Europe.In comparing the number of internet users, the US is in the lead with: roughly 50m users in 1997 compared to 25m in Western Europe or 6m in Germany according to EITO figures. Even corrected for population size the use rate in the US was double that in Germany.Rapid and dramatic reorganisations of industries are seen as the consequence of significant changes in interaction costs over this medium. According to Hagel and Singer this will induce the unbundling of corporations into one of their businesses which'they differentiate into: product innovation, infrastructure management and customer relationship management. They see inherent conflicts in these businesses as product innovation depends on speed, infrastructure management on scale and customer relationship management on scope. Specialised networked competitors are thought to outperform "bundled" corporations. They cite the computer industry, regional Bell operating companies, and newspapers as examples where huge vertically integrated companies specialise or will have to specialise on one business.Contacts between the enterprise, its business partners and customers should -- as a consequence -- change significantly. In order to classify this change we differentiated between three simplified communication types:
personalised contacts (visits, conferences, calls, faxes, letters or e-mails) with known persons,

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