Human-Computer Interaction: Ergonomics and User Interfaces - Vol. 1

By Hans-Jörg Bullinger; Jürgen Ziegler | Go to book overview

Matrix Evaluation Method for Planned Usability
Improvements Based on Customer Feedback

Konrad Baumann
Philips Business Electronics

"The last decade has witnessed significant world-wide growth of products with small screens and other limited characteristics of appearance and interaction." ( Marcus 1999)

"Are your help lines too expensive? The fact that customers need so much help is a sign of poor products. Want a better product? You probably have to reorganize your company and change the product process." ( Nielsen, Norman 1999)


1
Usability in Telecommunication

The matrix evaluation method described in the following is based on information about customers' usability problems gathered in a call center.

Call center data can provide information on "usual" usability problems having as root cause the insufficient consideration of usability principles during development. Usability principles include self-descriptiveness, consistency, simplicity, compatibility, error tolerance, and feedback. ( Baumann 1998)

More than this, call centers for telecommunication products can help detecting usability problems that arise during installation and setup of the product, connecting it properly to other devices, and registering for services and accounts.

These problems do not necessarily stem from a poor user interface or user manual of a single appliance but from the necessity to setup and use two or more appliances or services together in order to make them fulfill a specific task.

The circumstances leading to a usability problem may for example include a telephone or internet appliance owned by a specific customer, other devices the customer has already installed, the services offered by his telephone and internet service providers, as well as the appliances and service providers of the sending or receiving counterparts.

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