Human-Computer Interaction: Ergonomics and User Interfaces - Vol. 1

By Hans-Jörg Bullinger; Jürgen Ziegler | Go to book overview

A study on tactile interfaces as an aid to home
electronic appliance operation for the visually
impaired

Wen-Zhi Chen and Wen-Ko Chiou
Department of Industrial Design
Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan
E-mail: wenzhi@mail.cgu.edu.tw


1
Introduction

Much of the information human perceives is sensed through the visual organ. When the visual faculty has been impaired or the visual has been mask and no visual information is possible to be perceived, the aided perceiver of information is need. Now, when one looks at the products that are available in the market, the symbols and signs of product operation are almost is visual symbol, that is no help for visually impaired people, and sometime they may also harm themselves. People who lost their vision will have trouble in living, learning, and traveling. However, nowadays' development in auxiliary aid aims mainly at learning and traveling, particularly in information perception -- tactile display for computer user ( Shinohara et al. 1998), and seldom aims at living. Therefore, in this study, we intent to help to solve the living problems face by visually impaired people, particularly in how to use home electronic appliance when one's vision is lost.

Tactile and auditory faculties are the two main channels for person has relied on in receiving outside information, since the visual has been impaired or mask. For blind people the use of auditory in products has been of benefit in several areas ( Blenkhorn 1994). Making products speak is to make them more accessible to blind people. Tactile information offer some promise of being useful in certain special circumstances in which the visual and auditory senses are overburdened, and definite potential as aids to blind persons ( Sanders & McCormick 1987). Chen and Yu ( 1997, 1998) study the tactile symbols as an

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