Human-Computer Interaction: Ergonomics and User Interfaces - Vol. 1

By Hans-Jörg Bullinger; Jürgen Ziegler | Go to book overview

The Web Crusade Part 1: Motives for Creating
Personal Web Pages by Individuals

Gen Maruyama
Technology Research Center, Taisei Corporation
Sanken Bldg., 25-1, Hyakunin-cho 3-chome, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-0073,
JAPAN
phone: 81-3-5386-7561 fax: 81-3-5386-7577
E-mail: maruyama@mb.kiku.taisei.co.jp


1
Goal

Millions of Web pages, a galaxy of "homepages", are now found on the Internet, each of which has been created with its own purpose or motive.

Our "Web Crusade" activities aim to study and analyze those Web pages to see if they are designed appropriately to meet their motives or intentions, and help them create better-looking, easier-to-read Web pages. 'This report gives, as the first step, a definition of purposes or goals that creators of Web pages may have when they try to design "homepages". Particularly we focused on pages that individuals created (called personal Web pages), thus determining motives or intentions that the creators of personal Web pages have. In this study, we employed a psychological method to analyze creators' motives and tried to break down the motive types into several categories.


2
Method and Implementation

With this research we employed the Evaluation Grid Method (EGM), an approach where the motives or intentions have been obtained by direct interviews with each Web page creator.

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