Human-Computer Interaction: Ergonomics and User Interfaces - Vol. 1

By Hans-Jörg Bullinger; Jürgen Ziegler | Go to book overview

The Web Crusade Part 2: Creating a Web Page
Design Map

Dr. Masato Ujigawa Research and Development Institute, Takenaka Corporation 1-5-1, Otsuka, Inzai, Chiba, 270-1395, Japan. E-mail: masato.ujigawa@takenaka.co.jp


1. Introduction

The Web Crusade, an action plan for creating better web pages, is a joint research project by the Cyber Laboratory for Preference-Based Design. Its aim is to broaden the understanding of personal web page design among people. This report introduces the creation of a design map; a diagram that classifies the type of web page based on the impressions users have when "surfing the web".

In the Preference-Based Design research field, a concept called the Constructive Approach has recently become popular. This concept was originally developed from a golf instruction method. Before the introduction of this Constructive Approach, one standard and established style was applied to each golfer in lessons (called the Corrective Approach). However, because every golfer's goals, endurance and effort varies, it was concluded that there are limitations in this Corrective Approach where one ideal form is applied to each player. Therefore it has been recommended that professional trainers try to choose an appropriate goal for each golfer and instruct them how to achieve it. This is the Constructive Approach.

When individuals create web pages, their purposes are different, and the knowledge and time they can spend in creating them also varies. Therefore we thought it best to share techniques and information based on personal needs, that is, useful information for each individual.

Professional designers have extensive knowledge of various design types and can select an appropriate one depending on the situation at hand. General users do not usually have this knowledge, selecting only casual ideas in their design. If general users are given organized information on design types, it

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