Human-Computer Interaction: Ergonomics and User Interfaces - Vol. 1

By Hans-Jörg Bullinger; Jürgen Ziegler | Go to book overview

We are currently implementing a distributed Java system that uses the proposed framework to monitor an eye-tracking experiment in real time. The server application resides on the computer that is connected to the eye-tracking equipment and runs the driver software. This application uses Java Native Interface (JNI) to convert the driver's data samples into events and Remote Method Invocation (RMI) to send these events to the client listeners. This system will enable the experimenter to monitor the subject's eye fixations with a WWW browser.

Other proposed tools will convert legacy data collected during past experiments to new formats so that they can be presented on WWW.


4
Conclusion

The proliferation of Java programs gives us new opportunities to study humancomputer interaction. Our monitoring tool can analyze a wide variety of Java applets and applications, record the users' interactions with such systems and integrate them with the stream of user's eye fixations. Our framework employs object-oriented principles to ensure a flexible, easily extendible architecture that can incorporate future data formats as well as different processing schemas with minimurn programming effort. This framework is used in monitoring and analysis tools whose software architecture supports WWW browsers and other computer systems distributed across Internet.


5
References

Stelovsky, J., Crosby, M. E. ( 1997). A WWW Environment for Visualizing User Interfaces with Java Applets. In Salvendy, G. Smith M. & Koubek, R. (Eds.): Design of Computing Systems: Social and Ergonomic Considerations (Vol. 2), Proc. 7th Int. Conference on Human-Computer Interaction (HCI International '97, San Francisco, USA, August 24-29, 1997), pp. 755-758. Amsterdam: Elsevier.

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