Human-Computer Interaction: Ergonomics and User Interfaces - Vol. 1

By Hans-Jörg Bullinger; Jürgen Ziegler | Go to book overview

Project Leap: Addressing Measurement
Dysfunction in Review

Carleton Moore University of Hawaii, Manoa


1
A Problem with Reviews

The software industry and academia believe that software review, specifically Formal Technical Review ( FTR), is a powerful method for improving the quality of software. FTR traditionally is a manual process. Recently, computer mediated support for review has had a large impact on review. Computer support for FTR reduces the overhead of conducting reviews for reviewers and managers. This reduction in overhead increases the likelihood that software development organizations will adopt FTR. Computer support of FTR also allows for the easy collection of empirical measurement of process and products of software review. These measurements allow researchers or reviewers to gain valuable insights into the review process. With these measurements reviewers can also derive a simple measure of review efficiency. A very natural process improvement goal might be to improve the numerical value of review efficiency over time.

My research group, the Collaborative Software Development Laboratory ( CSDL), developed a computer supported review system called Collaborative Software Review System (CSRS) ( Tjahjono 1996). CSRS is a computer supported software review system implemented in UNIX with an Emacs front- end. It is fully instrumented and automatically records the effort of the participants of the review. The moderator of a review using CSRS may define and implement their own review process. Dr. Tjahjono and Dr. Johnson used CSRS to investigate the effectiveness of group meetings in FTR ( Johnson and Tjahjono 1998). Our experiences with CSRS caused us to start thinking about the issues of measurement dysfunction.

After looking closely at review metrics, we started to worry about measurement dysfunction ( Austin 1996) and reviews. Measurement dysfunction is a situation

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