Human-Computer Interaction: Ergonomics and User Interfaces - Vol. 1

By Hans-Jörg Bullinger; Jürgen Ziegler | Go to book overview

Ergonomic rules for real interface generation . The real interface can be automatically obtained from the MIC by using both ergonomic rules and interactive objects from a toolkit. The ergonomic rules used here aim at choosing the real interface aspects, such as the denomination of names and colors, the position of information in the window, the interaction styles, the interactive objects to represent the interaction objects on the screen and so on. For instance, a list box is the most appropriated interactive object, when the following recommendation is applied: it is to be avoided that an user inputs a string, in giving him the opportunity to select this string from a list ( Bodart and Vanderdonckt 1993).


4
Conclusion

The method described here can be considered suitable for designing the interfaces, because it doesn't require an important effort from the designer: he has only to learn the task model notation to obtain the first specifications of the interface; he doesn't care about both ergonomic principles and individual differences in the interface design, and finally he is guided to identify the most important operator's tasks. In order to improve the usability of the user interfaces, the adaptation process only addresses the assistance tasks based on the operator's cognitive model and takes into account the operator's preferences concerning the received assistance to update his experience level.


5
References

Bastien, J. M.C. & Scapin D.L.. ( 1993). Ergonomic criteria for the evaluation of user interfaces. INRIA Research report No. 156, Rocquencourt: INRIA.

Berthomé-Montoy, A. ( 1995). Une approche descriptive de l'auto-adaptativité des interfaces homme-machine. Ph.D. Dissertation, Lyon: Université Claude Bernard.

Bodart, F. & Vanderdonckt, J. ( 1993). "Expressing Guidelines into an Ergonomical StyleGuide for highly Interactive Applications". In S. Ashlund, K. Mullet, A. Henderson, EL Hollnagel , T. White (Eds.): Adjunct Proceedings of InterCHI'93, pp. 35-36.

Furtado, E. ( 1996). "Conception, Réalisation et Evaluation d'interfaces à partir des Spécifications Conceptuelles". Revue en Sciences cognitives. France.

Furtado, E. ( 1997). Mise en oeuvre d'une méthode de conception d'interfaces adaptatives pour des systèmes de supervision à partir des Spécifications Conceptuelles. Ph.D.

Harmut, W. & Huttner J. ( 1999). "Completing Human Factor Guidelines by Interactive Examples", Proc. of 8h Int. Conf. on Human-Computer Interaction (HCI Intemational'99)

Hoc, J.M. ( 1996). Supervision et contrôle de processus, La cognition en situation dynamique. Grenoble: Presses universitaires de Grenoble.

Kolski, C. ( 1993). Ingénierie des interfaces homme-machine. Editions Hermè

Larman C. ( 1998). Applying UML and Patterns. An Introduction to Object-oriented Analysis and Design. Prentice-Hall.

Ujita, H. 1992. Human characteristics of plant operation and man-machine interface. Reliability engineering and system safety, 38, 119-124.

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