Human-Computer Interaction: Ergonomics and User Interfaces - Vol. 1

By Hans-Jörg Bullinger; Jürgen Ziegler | Go to book overview

Assisting Designers in Developing Interactive
Business Oriented Applications

Jean Vanderdonckt Université catholique de Louvain, Institut d'Administration et de Gestion Place des Doyens, 1-B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium Phone: +32-(0)10-47 85 25 - Fax: +32-(0)10-47 83 24 E-mail: vanderdonckt@qant.ucl.ac.be, vanderoncktj@acm.org URL: http://www.qant.ucl.ac.be/membres/jv/jv.html


1
Introduction

Up to some recent years, many software tools, techniques and methods have been developed to systematically produce parts or whole of a user interface for a target interactive application. For example, software tools that automatically generate a working user interface have been demonstrated feasible and operational in the domain of interactive business oriented applications. These days, there is a shift of focus ( Vanderdonckt 1996) from automated generation of user interfaces (where the process is blindly driven without human intervention) to computer-aided design of user interface (where the task analyst, the designer, the developer, the evaluator are more active in the production process by deciding options, by driving the process, and by being assisted by software tools and guided by methods in this process).

This paper will primarily focus on assisting designers in a particular task involved in the global development life cycle: the presentation design. A visual, argumented, manipulable and computer-aided technique is presented to assist designers in cooperating with the system to build a first sketch of the presentation. This technique has been implemented in the SEGUIA tool (Systéme Expert Générant une << User Interface >> de manière Assistée).


2
The SEGUIA Presentation Generator

From a descriptiveviewpoint, SEGUIA consists in a software that automatically produces the presentation of a Windows-based user interface of a business ori-

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