Human-Computer Interaction: Ergonomics and User Interfaces - Vol. 1

By Hans-Jörg Bullinger; Jürgen Ziegler | Go to book overview

The Use of Eye Tracking for Human-Computer
Interaction Research and Usability Testing

Winfried Teiwes1, Michael Bachofer2, Greg Edwards3, Sandra Marshall4, Eberhard Schmidt5 and Wulf Teiwes6

1SensoMotoric Instruments GmbH, Teltow/ Berlin, Germany

2Fachhochschule für Druck und Medien, Stuttgart, Germany

3 Center for Study of Language and Information, Stanford University, U.S.A.

4Cognitive Ergonomics Research Facility, San Diego State University, U.S.A.

5 SensoMotoric Instruments Inc., Needham/ Boston, MA, U.S.A.

6 Visual Interaction GmbH, Berlin, Germany


1.
Introduction

Many research projects have been conducted in the past using point of regard measurement to analyze human-computer interfaces to improve usability. A variety of eye tracking methods have been developed with the aim of improving accuracy, ease of use and non-intrusive measurement. Recently developed video-based techniques for measuring eye movements allow contact-free recording with moderate head movements while the subject is looking at displays such as video or computer monitors (http://www.smi.de).

Accuracy of these techniques is subject to ongoing improvement and validation ( Telweset al. 1997). Ease of use of these devices for human-computer interaction research and usability testing requires further enhancements such as operator-free handling, semi-automatic setup and integrated calibration, as well as semi-automated analysis and its synchronization to changes of the visual scene. This paper presents particular examples of usability testing to highlight these needs as well as approaches for automated analysis and interpretation.

This development of automated tools for eye movement interpretation may improve the design of visual user interfaces as well as the use eye movement for computer interaction.

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