Human-Computer Interaction: Ergonomics and User Interfaces - Vol. 1

By Hans-Jörg Bullinger; Jürgen Ziegler | Go to book overview
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input device. First attempts are already using gaze fixations in handicapped applications, but mostly in standard graphical environments not designed for eye control. Especially new mobile computing devices (i.e. wearable PCs and PICs) require more efficient and if possible hands-free input devices such as voice control. Eye movements could add a new dimension to the interaction if integrated as a further multiniodal input device. However, the graphical interface needs to be designed for this purpose and automatic interpretation of eye movements to differentiate its multiple functions, such as scanning an image, gaze stabilization, reading, pointing, clicking and other desires needs to be provided. The,latter becomes of further importance since eye tracking technology is becoming available at high precision, low weight and low cost and therefore viable to be integrated as an additional input device for professional and consumer applications in binocular head mounted displays or monocular head-up micro displays.


6.
References

Bachofer, M. ( 1997). Wie wirkt Werbung im Web. Hamburg: Gruner & Jahr.

Edwards, G. ( 1998). "A tool for creating eye-aware applications that adapt to changes in user behavior". Proceedings of ASSETS 98 ( Marina del Rey, California).

Marshall, S. P., Morrison, J. G., Allred, L. E., Gillikin, S., McAllister, J. A. ( 1997). "Eye tracking in tactical decision-making environments: implementation and analysis". Proceedings of the 1997 Command and Control Research and Technology Symposium, pp. 347-355. Washington, DC: National Defense University, ACTIS.

Teiwes, W., Merfeld, D. M., Young, L. R. & Clarke, A. H. ( 1997). "Comparison of the scleral search coil and video-oculography techniques for three-dimensional eye movement measurement". In Fetter, M., Haslwanter, T., Misslisch, H. & Tweed, D. (Eds.): Three-Dimensional Kinematics of Eye, Head and Limb Movements, pp. 429-443. Harwood Academic Publishers.

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